Quantcast
The Parable of the Sower
AUTHOR: Luther, Martin
PUBLISHED ON: April 8, 2003
DOC SOURCE: CCN
PUBLISHED IN: Sermons

The Parable of the Sower by Martin Luther (1483-1546)
The following sermon is taken from volume II of, The Sermons of Martin Luther, published by Baker Book House (Grand
Rapids, MI). It was originally published in 1906 in english by Lutherans In All Lands (Minneapolis, MN), in a series titled
The Precious and Sacred Writings of Martin Luther, vol. 11. The original title of this sermon appears below. This e-text
was scanned and edited by Shane Rosenthal; it is in the public domain and it may be copied and distributed without
restriction. Original pagination from the Baker edition has been kept intact for purposes of reference.
THE DISCIPLES and THE FRUITS OF GOD’S WORD
LUKE 8:4-15: And when much people were gathered together, and were come to him out of every city, he spake by a
parable: A sower went out to sow his seed: and as he sowed, some fell by the way side; and it was trodden down, and the
fowls of the air devoured it. And some fell upon a rock; and as soon as it was sprung up, it withered away, because it lacked
moisture. And some fell among thorns; and the thorns sprang up with it, and choked it. And other fell on good ground, and
sprang up, and bare fruit an hundredfold. And when he had said these things, he cried, He that hath ears to hear, let him
hear. And his disciples asked him, saying, What might this parable be? And he said, Unto you it is given to know the
mysteries of the kingdom of God: but to others in parables; that seeing they might not see, and hearing they might not
understand. Now the parable is this: The seed is the word of God. Those by the way side are they that hear; then cometh the
devil, and taketh away the word out of their hearts, lest they should believe and be saved. They on the rock are they, which,
when they hear, receive the word with joy; and these have no root, which for a while believe, and in time of temptation fall
away. And that which fell among thorns are they, which, when they have heard, go forth, and are choked with cares and
riches and pleasures of this life, and bring no fruit to perfection. But that on the good ground are they, which in an honest
and good heart, having heard the word, keep it, and bring forth fruit with patience..
SECTION I. THE NATURE OF THE WORD SPOKEN HERE.
1. This Gospel treats of the disciples and the fruits, which the Word of God develops in the world. It does not speak of the
law nor of human institutions; but, as Christ himself says, of the Word of God, which he himself the sower preaches, for
the law bears no fruit, just as little as do the institutions of men. Christ however sets forth here four kinds of disciples of the
divine Word.

SECTION II. THE DISCIPLES OF THIS WORD.
2. The first class of disciples are those who hear the Word but neither understand nor esteem it. And these are not the mean
people in the world, but the greatest, wisest and the most saintly, in short they are the greatest part of mankind; for Christ
does not speak here of those who persecute the Word nor of those who fail to give their ear to it, but of those who hear it
and are students of it, who also wish to be called true Christians and to live in Christian fellowship with Christians and are
partakers of baptism and the Lord’s Supper. But they are of a carnal heart, and remain so, failing to appropriate the Word of
God to themselves, it goes in one ear and out the other. Just like the seed along the wayside did not fall into the earth, but
remained lying on the ground in the wayside, because the road was tramped hard by the feet of man and beast and it could
not take root.
3. Therefore Christ says the devil cometh and taketh away the Word from their heart, that they may not believe and be
saved. What power of Satan this alone reveals, that hearts, hardened through a worldly mind and life, lose the Word and let
it go, so that they never understand or confess it; but instead of the Word of God Satan sends false teachers to tread it under
foot by the doctrines of men. For it stands here written both that it was trodden under foot, and the birds of the heaven
devoured it. The birds Christ himself interprets as the messengers of the devil, who snatch away the Word and devour it,
which is done when he turns and blinds their hearts so that they neither understand nor esteem it, as St. Paul says in 2 Tim
4:4: “They will turn away their ears from the truth, and turn aside unto fables.” By the treading under foot of men Christ
means the teachings of men, that rule in our hearts, as he says in Mt 5:13 also of the salt that has lost its savor, it is cast out
and trodden under foot, of men; that is, as St. Paul says in 2 Ths. 2:11, they must believe a lie because they have not been
obedient to the truth.
4. Thus all heretics, fanatics and sects belong to this number, who understand the Gospel in a carnal way and explain it as
they please, to suit their own ideas, all of whom hear the Gospel and yet they bear no fruit, yea, more, they are governed by
Satan and are harder oppressed by human institutions than they were before they heard the Word. For it is a dreadful
utterance that Christ here gives that the devil taketh away the Word from their hearts, by which he clearly proves that the
devil rules mightily in their hearts, notwithstanding they are called Christians and hear the Word. Likewise it sounds
terribly that they are to be trodden under foot, and must be subject unto men and to their ruinous teachings, by which under
the appearance and name of the Gospel the devil takes the Word from them, so that they may never believe and be saved,
but must be lost forever; as the fanatical spirits of our day do in all lands. For where this Word is not, there is no salvation,
and great works or holy lives avail nothing, for [it is] with this, that he says: “They shall not be saved,” since they have not
the Word, he shows forcibly enough, that not their works but their faith in the Word alone saves, as Paul says to the
Romans: “It is, the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth” (Rom 1:16).
5. The second class of hearers are those who receive the Word with joy, but they do not persevere. These are also a large
multitude who understand the Word correctly and lay hold of it in its purity without any spirit of sect, division or
fanaticism, they rejoice also in that they know the real truth, and are able to know how they may be saved without works
through faith. They also know that they are free from the bondage of the law, of their conscience and of human teachings;
but when it comes to the test that they must suffer harm, disgrace and loss of life or property, then they fall and deny it; for
they have not root enough, and are not planted deep enough in the soil. Hence they are like the growth on a rock, which
springs forth fresh and green, that it is a pleasure to behold it and it awakens bright hopes. But when the sun shines hot it
withers, because it has no soil and moisture, and only rock is there. So these do; in times of persecution they deny or keep
silence about the Word, and work, speak and suffer all that their persecutors mention or wish, who formerly went forth and
spoke, and confessed with a fresh and joyful spirit the same, while there was still peace and no heat, so that there was hope
they would bear much fruit and serve the people. For these fruits are not only the works, but more the confession, preaching
and spreading of the Word, so that many others may thereby be converted and the kingdom of God be developed.
6. The third class are those who hear and understand the Word, but still it falls on the other side of the road, among the
pleasures and cares of this life, so that they also do nothing with the Word. And there is quite a large multitude of these; for
although they do not start heresies, like the first, but always possess the absolutely pure Word, they are also, not attacked on
the left as the others with opposition and persecution; yet they fall on the right side, and it is their ruin that they enjoy peace
and good days. Therefore they do not earnestly give themselves to the Word, but become indifferent and sink in the cares,
riches and pleasures of this life, so that they are of no benefit to any one. Therefore they are like the seed that fell among the
thorns. Although it is not rocky but good soil; not wayside but deeply plowed soil; yet, the thorns will not let it spring up,
they choke it. Thus these have all in the Word that is needed for their salvation, but they do not make any use of it, and they
rot in this life in carnal pleasures. To these belong those who hear the Word but do not bring under subjection their flesh.
They know their duty but do it not, they teach but do not practice what they teach, and are this year as they were last.
7. The fourth class are those who lay hold of and keep the Word in a good and honest heart, and bring forth fruit with
patience, those who hear the Word and steadfastly retain it, meditate upon it and act in harmony with it. The devil does not
snatch it away, nor are they thereby led astray, moreover the heat of persecution does not rob them of it, and the thorns of
pleasure and the avarice of the times do not hinder its growth; but they bear fruit by teaching others and by developing the
kingdom of God, hence they also do good to their neighbor in love; and therefore Christ adds, “they bring forth fruit with
patience.” For these must suffer much on account of the Word, shame and disgrace from fanatics and heretics, hatred and
jealousy with injury to body and property from their persecutors, not to mention what the thorns and the temptations of
their own flesh do, so that it may well be called the Word of the cross; for he who would keep it must bear the cross and
misfortune, and triumph. field,
8. He says: “In honest and good hearts.” Like a field that is without a thorn or brush, cleared and spacious, as a beautiful
clean place: so a heart is also cleared and clean, broad and spacious, that is without cares and avarice as to temporal needs,
so that the Word of God truly finds lodgment there. But the field is good, not only when it lies there cleared and level, but
when it is also rich and fruitful, possesses soil and is productive, and not like a stony and gravelly field. Just so is the heart
that has good soil and with a full spirit is strong, fertile and good to keep the Word and bring forth fruit with patience.
9. Here we see why it is no wonder there are so few true Christians, for all the seed does not fall into good ground, but only
the fourth and small part; and that they are not to be trusted who boast they are Christians and praise the teaching of the
Gospel; like Demas, a disciple of St. Paul, who forsook him at last (2 Tim. 4:10); like the disciples of Jesus, who turned
their backs to him (John 6:66). For Christ himself cries out here: “He that hath ears to hear, let him hear,” as if he should
say: O, how few true Christians there are; one dare not believe all to be Christians who are called Christians and hear the
Gospel, more is required than that.
10. All this is spoken for our instruction, that we may not go astray, since so many misuse the Gospel and few lay hold of it
aright. True it is unpleasant to preach to those who treat the Gospel so shamefully and even oppose it. For preaching is to
become so universal that the Gospel is to be proclaimed to all creatures, as Christ says in Mk. 16:15: “Preach the Gospel to
the whole creation;” and Ps. 19:4: “Their line is gone out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world.”
What business is it of mine that many do not esteem it? It must be that many are called but few are chosen. For the sake of
the good ground that brings forth fruit with patience, the seed must also fall fruitless by the wayside, on the rock and among
the thorns; inasmuch as we are assured that the Word of God does not go forth without bearing some fruit, but it always
finds also good ground; as Christ says here, some seed of the sower falls also into good ground, and not only by the
wayside, among the thorns and on stony ground. For wherever the Gospel goes you will find Christians. “My word shall not
return unto me void” (Is. 55:11).
SECTION IV. WHY CHRIST CALLS THE DOCTRINE CONCERNING THE DISCIPLES AND THE FRUITS OF THE
WORD A MYSTERY.
19. But what does it mean when he says: “Unto you it is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom of God”, etc.? What
are the mysteries? Shall one not know them, why then are they preached? A “mystery” is a hidden secret, that is not known:
and the “mysteries of the kingdom of God” are the things in the kingdom of God, as for example Christ with all his grace,
which he manifests to us, as Paul describes him; for he who knows Christ aright understands what God’s kingdom is, and
what is in it. And it is called a mystery because it is spiritual and secret, and indeed it remains so, where the spirit does not
reveal it. For although there are many who see and hear it, yet they do not understand it. just as there are many who preach
and hear Christ, how he offered himself for us; but all that is only upon their tongue and not in their heart; for they
themselves do not believe it, they do not experience it, as Paul in 1 Cor. 2:14 says: “The natural man receiveth not the
things of the Spirit of God!” Therefore Christ says here: “Unto you it is given”, the Spirit gives it to you that you not only
hear and see it, but acknowledge and believe it with your heart. Therefore it is now no longer a mysteryto you. But to the
others who hear it as well as you, and have no faith in their heart, they see and understand it not; to them it is a mystery and
it will continue unknown to them, and all that they hear is only like one hearing a parable or a dark saying. This is also
proved by the fanatics of our day, who know so much to preach about Christ; but as they themselves do not experience it in
their heart, they rush ahead and pass by the true foundation of the mystery and tramp around with questions and rare
foundlings, and when it comes to the test they do not know the least thing about trusting in God and finding in Christ the
forgiveness of their sins.
20. But Mark says (4:33), Christ spake therefore to the people with parables, that they might understand, each according to
his ability. How does that agree with what Matthew says, 13:13-14: He spake therefore unto them in parables, because they
did not understand? It must surely be that Mark wishes to say that parables serve to the end that they may get a hold of
coarse, rough people, although they do not indeed understand them, yet later, they may be taught and then they know: for
parables are naturally pleasing to the common people, and they easily remember them since they are taken from common
every day affairs, in the midst of which the people live. But Matthew means to say that these parables are of the nature that
no one can understand them, they may grasp and hear them as often as they will, unless the Spirit makes them known and
reveals them. Not that they should preach that we shall not understand them; but it naturally follows that wherever the
Spirit does not reveal them, no one understands them. However, Christ took these words from Is. 6:9-10, where the high
meaning of the divine foreknowledge is referred to, that God conceals and reveals to whom he will and whom he had in
mind from eternity.
This article was made available on the internet via REFORMATION INK (www.markers.com/ink). Refer any
correspondence to Shane Rosenthal: srose@cosmoaccess.net

Doc Viewed 9630 times

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating / 5. Vote count:

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.